December 2015 Newsletter

Laura K. Meier
Creating estate, business, and life plans that ensure a family’s complete protection and well-being.
Upcoming Events
 
We will be posting our January 2016 speaking schedule soon at meierevents.com.
 
Meet with Joshua or Laura Meier
 
Schedule a planning session with Meier Law Firm and find out exactly what type of planning your family needs to be completely taken care of if anything should happen to you
 
Click here to schedule your session or call our Client Services Director, Bonnie Johnson at 949.718.0420 Monday through Friday between 9am and 4pm.  Bonnie is happy to answer any questions you have and can help you get scheduled. 
 
About Joshua and Laura Meier
 
 
Joshua and Laura Meier are top California family trust attorneys and the parents of four young children. Their Newport Beach estate planning law firm is dedicated to guiding families.
 
Laura is the author of the highly-acclaimed book, Good Parents Worry, Great Parents Plan. Josh and Laura conduct estate planning workshops throughout Southern California and have been featured on NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX, WORTH, OC Metro, ParentingOC, and more.
 
Click here to read more about Josh and Laura.
 
Thank you for Your Fabulous Online Reviews!
 
We want to sincerely thank you for your online reviews!

 

"Words alone cannot express the depth of respect, admiration, and gratitude I have for Laura, Bonnie & Josh!!! They are a wonderful trio to work with; this is a law firm that prides itself on integrity & ethics by always doing the right thing for their clients and they have the knowledge, the expertise, the experience to provide top notch estate planning services that are unequalled in Orange County and top it off they are so friendly, warm and supportive to their clients. Who would've thought... A lawyer with the skills & expertise to be best in the highly competitive legal field while at the same time the morals to be a saint??!! If you're looking for estate planning stop what you're doing, call Bonnie and make an appointment!!!"—Peter S.—YELP Review

 
 
 
 
 
 
Personal Note From Josh and Laura
 
 
12th Annual Orange County Children's Book Festical
 
Dear Laura,
 

We hope this email finds your family well. We were sad to hear about the violence in San Bernardino last week. It's hard to think something so awful could happen, especially so close to home. In case you missed it, we posted an article on our Meier Law Firm Facebook Page on how to talk with your kids about what happened. I can't believe we have to even have these conversations with our kids. 

 

Ideally, this time of year would only bring peace, joy, and happiness, but we know many people are experiencing just the opposite. As our family prepares to celebrate Christmas, we are mindful of the heartache of others, and Christ's call to love one another. 

 

On a lighter note, Josh and the kids did a great job decorating our Christmas tree. I get a high five for capturing the cool photo above of Josh putting on the final touches.

 

We wish your family many blessings this holiday season as you celebrate your special traditions.

 
All the best,
Interesting Image
 
Weekly Quick-Step For the Prosperous Family

 

Quickstep: 9 Ways to Finish the Year Strong (Tips taken from article written by Erika Andersen, Forbes Contributor)

 

What it is: Specific actions that can help you wrap up loose ends, enjoy the holidays, and start the new year fresh.

 

Why you need this: We all have things we meant to get around too this year, and simply didn't.  By crossing what we can off out to do list, we won't have anything hanging over us during the holidays when we're trying to relax, and we can start the year fresh with new goals.

 

Estimated time: 1 hour per week

 

How to do it:

  1. Remove small annoyances: Over the next month, when you see minor hanging chads in your life, take a few minutes to do something about them.  
  2. Clear out your space: It’s amazing how much stuff most of us have that we don’t need or use. 
  3. Clear up confusion:  We often let minor (or not so minor) confusions linger, generally because we’re afraid to find out the answers to our questions. Find out. You’ll feel clearer, and you’ll have a better sense of what to do next.
  4. Have important conversations:  Is there something you’ve been carrying around with you and not saying? 
  5. Ask for what you want:  When you’re having those tough conversations, don’t just complain: request.  
  6. Stop procrastinating: Next time you think about doing something you’ve been putting off, notice what you say to yourself about it (I suspect it’s either I don’t have time to do that right now, or I can get to that later). Revise your self-talk by reminding yourself of the benefits of doing the thing.
  7. Reconnect: Create some little windows of quiet to enjoy those closest to you.  
  8. Do something good: Take a bit of time before the year is out to give of yourself – time, money, expertise, knowledge - to help someone else.  Give to your favorite charity, volunteer at a soup kitchen, provide food or toys to homeless children – anything to make the world a better place.
  9. Think about your future: Stay home New year’s Eve with your spouse or a good friend, talk about the year that’s passed: what was great and not so great.  And then think together about the year ahead: what you’d like to accomplish, learn and experience. It’s a great way to set yourself up for a wonderful year to come.

To read the full commentary on the tips above, click here to go to Erika Andersen's article on Forbes.

 

 
Featured Article

Smart Families Plan With Logic, Not Emotion

By Laura K. Meier, Esq. 
 

When it comes to family, money, and death, it’s hard not to feel emotional. And while emotion can be a great motivator for helping us act, it can also cloud our judgment or prevent us from making decisions that are best for ourselves or our loved ones.

 

As an estate planning attorney, I have seen my fair share of emotions. That’s why I keep a tissue box in hand’s reach at my office anytime I meet with my clients. My favorite story is when I had a young couple come in to name permanent guardians for their baby and after they both logically agreed that the wife’s mother was not a suitable choice, the wife then broke down in tears and sobbed until her husband leaned over to me and said “just put her mother down as the guardian.”

 

Here are 3 tips for helping you make important estate planning decisions for your family without letting emotion get in the way:

 

  1. Involve a Third Party. Whether it’s a counselor, an attorney, or a pastor, having an educated neutral third party present to help you talk through a decision can help temper your emotions. It’s best to use a third party who will not be personally affected by your decision, who is well-educated on the topic at hand, and can provide you real life insight on how your decision will likely play out. You’re also more likely to put on a good game face for the third-party than you would have had you made the decision with just your spouse or alone.
  2. Use an Objective Process For Making a Decision. Having objective criteria for making a decision can be tremendously helpful. When we help parents name guardians for their children, we take them through an easy three step process that helps them objectively decide on a guardian, rather than just relying on emotion. For example, we have parents identify their top three priorities when it comes to raising their kids. Then we ask them if the people they have in mind for raising their kids meet that objective criteria.

Click here to finish article and see special offer.

 

 
Thank You
 

Thank you to the United Cerebral Palsy Orange County, and the Irvine Community Nursery School for hosting our estate planning workshops.

 

Thank you to Yousef AbuhakmehDon Saulic,  Arno and Tricia, The Stoneburner Family, Jeremy Rose, Ryan Brizendine, Bruce Parker, Marc and Anne Bonfeld,Shane Stanfield, Brent Kramer, and Jennifer Owens for your referrals